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June 27, 2022

Race Across the Sky: Book Review

By Wendy Robards

Race Across the Sky, by Derek Sherman.

Over the past decade he had successfully extracted any emotional confusion from his life. Jobs, career, family, the expectations of the world, were all like forgotten high school friends. But now, like a patient in remission who with horror senses his symptoms returning, Caleb felt a range of sharp emotions rising up; emotions he thought he had put aside forever. - from Race Across the Sky -

Caleb Oberest works in a highly-paid corporate position in New York City until the events of 9-11 shatter his world. On an impulse, he quits his job and moves to Colorado to join an elite group of ultra-marathoners. These runners slave beneath the tutelage of a man named Mack, who believes in pushing one's body to such an extreme as to produce kinetic energy capable of sustaining the body with as little as four hours of sleep and very little fuel. To belong, members of the group sever ties to family and friends and vow to turn from any romantic relationships. Caleb immerses himself in this running cult, cutting all connection to his family to become a premier ultra-marathoner. But then a young woman named June arrives in the mountains of Colorado with her very ill infant daughter, Lily, looking for the healing powers which Mack promises ... and everything changes.

Shane, Caleb's brother, works at a biotech firm which finds cures for fatal diseases. He and his wife, Janelle, are expecting their first baby and life has never seemed better. Then Shane gets a letter from Caleb after eleven years of silence. Caleb is desperate for a cure for Lily. Reeling from his own feelings toward becoming a father, Shane makes a decision to help in any way he can even if it means putting his career and everything he loves at risk.

Derek Sherman's debut novel, Race Across the Sky, explores the limits of human endurance both physically and emotionally. Narrated in alternating points of view between Shane and Caleb, the story reels the reader into the obsessive world of competitive distance running and the lure of cults, as well as giving a disturbing glimpse into the powerful, financially driven realm of biotechnology firms and the development of medicines.

Sherman's prose is character driven and compelling. From page one, I found myself intrigued and embroiled in the lives of the characters. Sensitive without being maudlin, the story is ultimately about love -- that between brothers, and between parents and children, and also romantic love and how it can save us from despair. As I was reading, I found myself asking "What would you do to save someone else? What would you do for the person you love? Would you risk everything?"

Race Across the Sky is dazzling in its descriptions of the Colorado and California mountains. As a runner once myself, I thought Sherman truly captured the compulsion of athletic competition and the battle that runners have within themselves to simply finish a distance race. I also loved the insight into the medical world of drug companies and the cutting edge technology of the biotech field.

I fully enjoyed this novel from beginning to end. It is compulsively readable with a strong plot, well-constructed characters, and terrific writing. Original and thought-provoking, I can recommend Race Across the Sky for readers who like their novels to be provocative.

★ ★ ★ ★

FTC Disclosure: This novel was sent to me by the publisher for review as part of TLC Book Tours.

  • Rating System

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ = Excellent
★ ★ ★ ★ = Good/Very Good
★ ★ ★ = Okay read
★ ★ = Not recommended
★ = Ugh! Don't waste your time.

Catch all of Wendy Robard's reviews in her fabulous blog, "Caribousmom".

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Article © Wendy Robards. All rights reserved.
Published on 2013-09-02
2 Reader Comments
Anonymous
03/05/2014
02:06:33 AM
Loved this book!
Mike Boya
03/05/2014
11:05:21 PM
My book store recommended this to me when I was looking for nonfiction about running. I read it in three days. Best novel I've read in forever--I usually read mysteries. I can't stop thinking about the last 75 pages. Read this book if you are a dad, a runner, or care about medicine!
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