Piker Press Banner
September 26, 2022

Reflections from the Newsreel 22: Tragedy in Kabul

By Carl Wade Thompson

On my daily drive to work, I often listen to NPR to hear the latest news. Most days I only half listen, but it seems after the current election, that world gets worse every day like a patient dying slowly of a disease with no cure. Today was no different, as I listened intently to the details of a suicide bombing in Kabul that killed over 80 people. Listening to the story, I wondered if there would ever be an end to the bloodshed, an end to war, and knew that such thinking was naïve. How long had we been at war in Afghanistan? Nearly two decades have passed, and most have forgotten that we are still at war. As the news moved on to a different story, I thought about those killed in the bombing, the people affected by such a tragic event. I can only believe that humanity will prevail, the world will move on and not keep repeating the cycle of violence that seems to envelop every single day. Maybe it is idyllic, I know, but one thing was certain. Tomorrow would be another day, and the sun would rise again. But today, just for today, I would reflect on those killed and know people died for no reason. Some days it feels like I hear only bad news, and a dark cloud seems to hover overhead. As I headed down Beach Street in Haltom City, I said a silent prayer for those who died. But I knew, deep down, that it was not the end. More people would die, and the world would shrug them off like it doesn't matter. Sometime I wonder if anyone ever really listens anymore? Peace, such a fragile war, seems so distant, but I have to keep in mind. Because without hope and ideals, the world will never change. I just have to keep striving to do the right thing, to do my part to help.

For that will move forward.






Article © Carl Wade Thompson. All rights reserved.
Published on 2017-06-05
Image(s) are public domain.
0 Reader Comments
Your Comments






The Piker Press moderates all comments.
Click here for the commenting policy.